It's all well and good that the Federal Government is going after [Bernard Ebbers](http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/03/03/financial1154EST0123.

DTL), [Jeffrey Skilling](http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/02/20/BUGGS5452226.

DTL), [Andrew Fastow and others](http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/03/05/national1613EST0664.

DTL) for criminal conduct including securities fraud. Some of these people, including [Martha Stewart](http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2004/03/05/national1508EST0626.

DTL), have even been found guilty. The Bush administration will, no doubtedly, point to these convictions as evidence that they are vigorously persuing corporate malfeasance.

However, until I see Ken Lay facing a judge and jury after being walked into the courthouse wearing handcuffs, the Bush administration deserves no credit.

Perhaps you remember Ken Lay. He's the guy at Enron who gave Andrew Fastow and Jeffrey Skilling their marching orders. He's the guy who has been sitting comfortably at home while his two former employees face prison terms and turn on each other in the courtroom. Yes, that Ken Lay.

Perhaps you also remember that Ken Lay and Enron contributed millions of dollars to president Bush's 2000 Presidential election campaign. Bush also flew around the country to various campaign stops on the Enron corporate jet.

Enron collapsed years ago and, strangely enough, Ken Lay is still in the clear. Why? Could it be the millions of dollars Kenny Boy (Dubya's nickname for Lay) sent Bush's way? Now there's an interesting thought.

If you needed yet another example of how money really does buy freedom from the law, you need look no further than Kenny Boy.