Went for an interview today which had been arranged by a headhunter. To get to the interview from an engagement beforehand involved a roughly thirty minute walk through rainy SF. However, that was OK because I had the time and rain gear. When I got to the interview, the interviewer was AWOL. Apparently, he'd been dispatched to NYC and didn't have the time or wherewithal to cancel the interview. So, I ended up interviewing with the VP of Marketing for a technical position. The VP was a very nice lady, but it was still a somewhat annoying situation.

In light of the recent spate of "hacking" articles in the popular media,I thought it was appropriate to demonstrate, in small measure, just how much "hacking" is really going on in the wild. For instance, my home network is hidden behind one host running a firewall. So, if you imagine the Internet to be a human body, my firewall is just one cell in the larger whole. However, that firewall provides interesting information about who's doing what and when to it. For instance, in the past day,the following hosts have probed my machine looking for vulnerabilities they could exploit:- Name: c108239-c.plano1.tx.home.com
Address: 24.14.70.215
- Name: adsl-216-103-84-27.dsl.snfc21.pacbell.net
Address: 216.103.84.27
- Name: mail.omahalink.net
Address: 206.151.152.3
- Name: h55b127.delphi.afb.lu.se
Address: 194.47.217.196
- Name: dns.sf-bsi.co.jp
Address: 210.160.138.178
There are actually several others that I didn't put here because they weren't listed in DNS (and I'd rather not put up so many whoisentries in this space). So, in the course of a day, we've got several attempts to attach to my machine. One from Plano, Texas. Another from Japan. A third from Sweden. A fourth from Omaha, NE. Afifth from the San Francisco Bay Area. Truly cracking has gone global and no stone is left unturned in the search for vulnerable hosts.